The Latest

anthrocentric:

i was fixin to get so pissed
Jul 27, 2014 / 1,017 notes

anthrocentric:

i was fixin to get so pissed

The thing about patriarchy is that individual men, gay and straight, are often really wonderful people who you love deeply, but they have internalized some really poisonous shit. So every once in a while they say or do something that really shakes you because you’re no longer totally certain they see you as a human being, and you feel totally disempowered to explain that to them.

(via forgetwhoweare)

Always reblog

(via water-veiled)

(via anthrocentric)

Jul 25, 2014 / 57,019 notes
Jul 25, 2014 / 198,839 notes

hobbitballerina:

chelseawelseyknight:

witchesbitchesandbritches:

lifeundefeated:

Yea it’s clearly our “generation that’s making homosexuality a trend.” Seriously, pisses me off when people say that. look at this! It’s always been around, it’s not a trend, it’s real. It’s beautiful.

These are really beautiful images.

This makes me really happy

There’s a long history of lesbian-like activity in the West.  In the 19th century US, especially after the Civil War killed off so many young men, middle-class and other genteel girls were encouraged in Boston marriages — relationships with other women of similar educational and class backgrounds.  Since women were considered naturally chaste and disinterested in sex, these love affairs were seen as innocent and spiritual.  Women’s lives were wholly separate from men’s that young women infrequently had male friends who weren’t considered a marriage prospect.  They were encouraged to keep to all-female social circles, and the advent of women’s colleges further encouraged that.  Women were expected to mentor each other, love each other, dance with each other, with the older woman acting as the cavalier, the man in the relationship, protecting and guiding the younger, pursuing her and courting her in ways not unlike how young men would court their brides.  But the prevailing cultural wisdom was that these relationships would be limited to kisses and poetry — women were incapable of sexual desire, they tolerated sex in heterosexual marriages because men were sex-driven beasts who demanded it of them.  Without a man, it was presumed that these relationships would be chaste, innocent, and wholly emotional.  Lesbian-like behaviour is most tolerated when women are perceived as less sexual than men.  Homosexual behaviour becomes threatening when sex is involved — when, in the 1920s, women were seen as able to have sexual drives and the idea of sexually companionable marriages came onto the landscape, Boston marriages suddenly became unnatural and disgusting because they directed women’s sexual interests towards other women instead of to the proper channels: towards men.  The flapper was all about the sexually available (to men) young woman.  She contributed to the demise of widely accepted lesbian or lesbian-like relationships.  As soon as the flapper was capable of wanting sex herself instead of tolerating it from her male partner, lesbian/lesbian-like relationships were threatening, deviant, and ruined young women’s chances to become good wives and mothers.

So remember this as you look at the pre-1920s images.  Those women were allowed these passionate loves, even encouraged in them (sometimes after they managed to get a husband, Eleanor Roosevelt in particular), all because the patriarchy was convinced that women weren’t capable of sexual feelings towards one another.  As long as women were seen as desexed, as creatures of sentiment and emotion instead of passion and desire, lesbianism wasn’t a threat.  The minute women were regarded by patriarchal culture as having a natural sex drive, lesbian-like behaviour became deviant and damning.

We didn’t invent homosexuality in the past 20 or 30 or 50 years.  But we continue to labour under the belief and cultural expectation that women’s sexuality is something owed to and owned by men, forever de-legitimising women’s relationships unless men in some way benefit. 

(via anthrocentric)

anthrocentric:

Don’t Pop That Bubble Wrap! Scientists Turn Trash Into Test Tubes

While visiting scientists around the world, Whitesides noticed that many labs in developing countries don’t even have simple pieces of equipment, such as test tubes for running blood tests, storing urine samples or growing microbes.

That’s when the idea popped into his head: bubble wrap. The packaging material is readily available all over the globe, and scientists often have it around the lab because other equipment is shipped in it.
So Whitesides and his team tried injecting blood and chemicals into the clear blisters with a needle and syringe. They then sealed the holes with nail polish.
The bubbles held the liquid with no problem. And since the plastic is clear, the team could use the mini-test tubes for tests that involve color changes. For instance, to test for anemia, the scientists added a chemical that changes colors when it reacts with iron in blood. They also successfully grew bacteria and worms inside the bubbles.
But to make a good test tube or petri dish, the bubble wrap also needed to be sterile.
So Whitesides’ students filled the plastic bubbles with a solution of food for microorganisms and looked to see if bacteria grew inside. After four days, no microbes appeared. To their surprise, the air and plastic inside the bubbles were completely sterile.
Jul 25, 2014 / 99 notes

anthrocentric:

Don’t Pop That Bubble Wrap! Scientists Turn Trash Into Test Tubes

While visiting scientists around the world, Whitesides noticed that many labs in developing countries don’t even have simple pieces of equipment, such as test tubes for running blood tests, storing urine samples or growing microbes.

That’s when the idea popped into his head: bubble wrap. The packaging material is readily available all over the globe, and scientists often have it around the lab because other equipment is shipped in it.

So Whitesides and his team tried injecting blood and chemicals into the clear blisters with a needle and syringe. They then sealed the holes with nail polish.

The bubbles held the liquid with no problem. And since the plastic is clear, the team could use the mini-test tubes for tests that involve color changes. For instance, to test for anemia, the scientists added a chemical that changes colors when it reacts with iron in blood. They also successfully grew bacteria and worms inside the bubbles.

But to make a good test tube or petri dish, the bubble wrap also needed to be sterile.

So Whitesides’ students filled the plastic bubbles with a solution of food for microorganisms and looked to see if bacteria grew inside. After four days, no microbes appeared. To their surprise, the air and plastic inside the bubbles were completely sterile.

waywardandwanderlust:

heartsandmagic:

Cat doesn’t know what to do with the butterfly that flew on its paw.

I can’t breathe I’m laughing too hard
Jul 19, 2014 / 309,868 notes

waywardandwanderlust:

heartsandmagic:

Cat doesn’t know what to do with the butterfly that flew on its paw.

I can’t breathe I’m laughing too hard

(via randomnymity)

lostinhistory:

teallikethecolor:

a-strong-female-character:

mhalachai:

patrickthomson:

this is your periodic reminder that old-timey medicines did not fuck around

Yeah that’d probably handle a cough.

CHLOROFORM?!

That’ll do it.

Back when medicine was a party in a bottle.
Jul 19, 2014 / 46,273 notes

lostinhistory:

teallikethecolor:

a-strong-female-character:

mhalachai:

patrickthomson:

this is your periodic reminder that old-timey medicines did not fuck around

Yeah that’d probably handle a cough.

CHLOROFORM?!

That’ll do it.

Back when medicine was a party in a bottle.

(via anthrocentric)

Jul 12, 2014 / 613 notes

(via lesserjoke)

Jul 10, 2014 / 194,903 notes

katiedollthesillyhead:

antisocial-internet-addict:

katiedollthesillyhead:

gotta love knitting needles. i can make a scarf. i can make a hat. i can stab your eyes out. i can make mittens.

What was that middle part?

i can make a hat

(via onetine)

As a university tutor in my hometown, a city which is roughly 40% black and 37% white, I still had students asking me, “Do they just never learn how to talk right?” I pull up a chair when this happens, “Listen up, gang.” So what do I tell them? Well, the goal is to convey that, scientifically speaking, non-standard varieties of English such as the English spoken by Rachel Jeantel and the ‘proper English’ they’ve been taught are equally communicative. I go over the differences and point out that both have a rule system that must be followed to speak convincingly.

But then, I don’t see why there should need to be that justification. So I end up trying to teach respect. If they have a student that speaks a non-standard variety of English, they need to understand that that student is therefore competent in understanding at least two versions of English: the version they speak at home and other safe environments, and the one forced upon them when listening to you. Respect that.

The alarmingly pervasive idea that standard English equates to ‘good grammar’ and non-standard English equates to ‘bad grammar’ is false and exclusionary. When it’s used in conjunction with intelligence and credibility of a young black woman, it’s reminiscent of the faulty scientific racism of “The Bell Curve.” But language shaming is currently acceptable behavior in the status quo. It is one of the last bastions of unabashed racism and classism.
Jul 9, 2014 / 8,331 notes
onetine:
Jul 9, 2014 / 1,298 notes
mapsontheweb:

Evolution of Languages in the Iberian Peninsula, 1000-2000

Gif-Explode version : http://gif-explode.com/?explode=http://i.imgur.com/JZzXIVA.gif
Jul 9, 2014 / 586 notes

mapsontheweb:

Evolution of Languages in the Iberian Peninsula, 1000-2000

(via anthrocentric)

hotdogcephalopod:

meddlingwithnature:

A little gif of a paw dissection done at the Art Academy of Cincinnati

This is absolutely beautiful. It’s incredible.
Jul 9, 2014 / 4,604 notes

hotdogcephalopod:

meddlingwithnature:

A little gif of a paw dissection done at the Art Academy of Cincinnati

This is absolutely beautiful. It’s incredible.

(via theolduvaigorge)

Jul 9, 2014 / 112,325 notes

mymodernmet:

The Abyss Table is a stunning coffee table that mimics the depths of the ocean with stacked layers of wood and glass. Made by London-based furniture design company Duffy London, the limited-edition piece comes with the hefty price tag of £5,800 (nearly $10,000).

(via anthrocentric)

Jul 9, 2014 / 47,870 notes
Jul 8, 2014 / 1,441 notes

cleolinda:

revnickie:

hannibalina:

Full Interview

I’m sure it’s exactly like C-3PO and R2. JFC Bryan. But also yes.

Will spends a lot of time beeping angrily?

(via lesserjoke)